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Posts Tagged ‘capitalism’

Baker’s Block

March 31, 2015 Leave a comment

Indiana’s “Freedom of Religion” law reminds us that, despite our democratic notions, we do not live in an egalitarian society. Aristocrats will defend the status quo by all means necessary. Even as society undergoes changes in cultural perspectives and popular support for these groups wanes they will battle to maintain control. Such groups do not go gentle into that good night: they fight to maintain power.

Aristocrats do not recognize their passing. Even in light of new ideas and perspectives a battle will be mounted to reverse the changing trends. Often, discrimination is a common utility for such figures. To deny access to a service allows a powerful group to manipulate resources; to complicate the day-to-day operations of an undesired faction to focus on their goals. “If I don’t like the things you do, I’ll make your life a challenge”, they might say. Ultimately the means to defeat such actions is to swell around the new ideas and work to quell aristocratic abuse of power.

For the cake maker who refuses to sell cakes to homosexuals there are various methods of response. One might create legislation to ban or allow such limitations. Another option is to recognize the power of the market. For a baker to limit his or her customer base is to sacrifice a source of revenue. Beyond the denied couples a portion of other populations (heterosexual couples) will choose to purchase cakes elsewhere in response to these ideas. Though not directly affected, the belief that someone else is being abused warrants a response. “I would never pay a baker who refused to sell to homosexuals”, they might say.

In the end we are faced with variable responses. Legislation might provide for a desired end, but the more powerful response resides in the market. Let the dollars make the statements. In order to defeat aristocrats whose ideas have waned we are better served by popular response.

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Unboxing an Unboxing Trend

September 3, 2014 Leave a comment

The packaging is opened, its corners peeled and pulled and yanked from deep inside the cardboard box? The newest model cell phone. Unboxing videos are increasingly popular on Youtube. A recent article in The Dublin Review suggests marks the count at “hundreds of thousands”, though these starts are from 2006. Undoubtedly the trend of unboxing will increase as more and more consumers decide the sensations usually reserved for Christmas morning are better made for public and broadcasted for the world.

“Vicarious consumption” is a means by which the non-consumer plays the part of the consumer. When an income doesn’t allow for grand indulgences, or a spouse denies one’s joys, what is shopper self to do? Shop the windows? Load the bucket list of Amazon hopefuls?

“Unboxing videos” are the spiciest indulgence for the shopper-yet-denied.  Indulgences by proxy are common joys indulged. Glimpsing the unboxing video on Youtube we witness our fantasies yet closer. If we cannot make the purchase we can watch someone else enjoying what we want. We’ll be there soon, we hope, or maybe its the watching that’s the pleasure. Is there any greater feeling than the opening of the package? Every dream and expectation remains in possibility. The device has yet to fail and every need we see answered by the item (both realistic and fantastic) have yet to be dissolved. The gift is in the getting.

By That Which We Carry

August 6, 2012 Leave a comment

The items we choose to carry with us reveal much about both who we are and how we want the world to perceive us. Identities are created and suggested in our actions and via these accessories we extend these notions outward. In many ways our media is a mirror of our own individual tasks at “persona creation” and offer a glimpse into the means by which we say who we are to others.

The items which fill our pockets come from choices. Consumer culture has long understood the power of branding and the tribal tendencies of human being. We do more than simply own a phone; instead, that phone is a device of numerous connections from which we can be categorized. An “Apple User” or “IPhone Owner” means less about the company and product and more about we as individual and consumer who has made a decision.

There is power in choice and judging the effects of our choices is the basis of many details of life. Bad decisions suggest flawed character and, vice inversely, notions of bad character come about when evaluating one’s choices. How we we establish who a person is? Limited as we are with our ability to penetrate the psyche, the raw evidence of choices and character function as the basis of our conclusions.

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